Emanuel Leutze, Washington Crossing the Delaware, 1851

The current painting in the Metropolitan Museum in New York is the second version completed by Leutze. The first, located in the Kunsthalle in Bremen, was destroyed by Allied bombing in the Second World War. The original work was painted as an encouragement to reformers in Europe by dramatizing the example of Americans' struggle for freedom.

(Click the image for a lightbox view)

This iconic image of America’s fight for freedom represents the many races, nationalities and occupations that contributed to the victory: a Scotsman in bonnet, an African-American facing backwards as he rows, a Native American, riflemen from the western states, and (possibly) a woman wearing pants and a red jacket. 

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 African-American oarsman, George Qashington, James Monroe

African-American oarsman, George Qashington, James Monroe

The man holding the flag and standing behind General Washington is possible Lieutenant James Monroe, future President of the United States of America.

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