Emanuel Leutze, Washington Crossing the Deleware

The current painting in the Metropolitan Museum in New York, is the second version completed by Leutze. The first, located in the Kunsthalle in Bremen, was destroyed by Allied bombing in the Second World War. The original work was painted as an encouragement to reformers in Europe by dramatizing the example of Americans' struggle for freedom.

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"The people in the boat represent a cross-section of the American colonies, including a man in a Scottish bonnet and a man of African descent facing backward next to each other in the front, western riflemen at the bow and stern, two farmers in broad-brimmed hats near the back (one with bandaged head), and an androgynous rower in a red shirt, possibly meant to be a woman in man's clothing. There is also a man at the back of the boat wearing what appears to be Native American garb to represent the idea that all people in the new United States of America were represented as present in the boat along with Washington on his way to victory and success." -- Wikipedia

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 African-American oarsman, George Qashington, James Monroe

African-American oarsman, George Qashington, James Monroe

"According to the 1853 exhibition catalogue, the man standing next to Washington and holding the flag is Lieutenant James Monroe, future President of the United States."

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